Sunova - Christian Fletcher - Doheny - Suns Tec

$700.00
Brand: Sunova

Available dimensions 

Length Width Depth Volume
5'0"
19 1/4"
1 11/16"
22 ltr
5'2"
19 7/8"
1 3/4"
24.3 ltr
5'4"
20 1/2"
1 13/16"
26.7 ltr
5'6"
21 3/16"
1 7/8"
29.3 ltr
5'8"
21 13/16"
1 15/16"
32.1 ltr
5'10"
22 7/16"
2" 35 ltr
6'0"
23 1/16"
2 1/16"
38.1


Doheny

Surfer's Journal : What was the learning process like? In terms of refinement, a high-performance board isn’t nearly as forgiving as a fish or a log.

Andrew Doheny: A high-performance shortboard is the hardest type of board to make because you’re making a board with the smallest amount of foam you can get away with. I’m still figuring it out. It’s just trial and error—cutting away at a blank, glassing it, and riding it to see if it works. I just went at it. I tried to keep my ears open and listen to everyone. Cordell [Miller] gave me tips. So did Lance Collins. Stretch gave me a lot of good advice. I went up to Santa Cruz with John John. We were shaping a board with Stretch and he made me my first template. It was a spin template. And he taught me how to use a planer. That was kind of when my boards started getting more functional. Before that, I was just cutting them out and sanding them down with a Surform, like through the skin. That’s a lot of fucking work. So the planer just belted off, like, five hours of work immediately. That’s when the shapes started to get a little better and more functional.

SUN Technology 

The Suns are a rock solid product, that covers a wide variety of users at an accessible price point.

Christian Fletcher 

Christian Fletcher was born in Hawaii but grew up in San Clemente. He began surfing competitively at 5. He placed second in the 1982 U.S. Championships and third in the 1985 National Scholastic Surfing Association Juniors. In 1989 he appeared on the cover of Surfer magazine. Fletcher placed second in the 1982 U.S. Championships and finished the 1985 NSSA Open Season ranked third in Juniors. The same year, at age 14, he turned pro.

Even at that early age, he was bored by much of the surfing going on around him. "I just grew up skateboarding," he recalls, "and it seemed like, you know, I was doing airs on my skateboard and it just seemed natural to do on the surfboard, too. And I just couldn't stand doing what everybody else was doing." He tried his luck in selected events on the ASP world tour for several years, but failed miserably.

If contests could not provide an avenue for his progressive approach, surf videos could. He was insisting that the next frontier for surfing was in the air. Christian Fletcher is the founding father of aerial surfing.